WebTube

Armenians of Iran (Part 1 of 3)

multi part videos future coming here soon
Amazon Recommendation Ads
328   23 days ago
TadehDavtian | 0 subscribers
328   23 days ago
Armenians of Iran (Part 1 of 3)

Iran's introduction to the 17th century international scene was relatively smooth, calculated, and well executed. As a new competitive economic power in the region, Iran's Shah Abbas I the Great (1587-1629) masterminded the Safavid dynasty's bold strategy, challenging both the Ottomans and the Mughuls. Abbas's reforms weakened Ottoman desire to invade Iran, strengthened Iranian industry and agriculture and, most importantly, ushered in an era of tolerance and mutual understanding among the Muslim population of Isfahan and the Christian communities of Iran.

Looking back on Iran's long history, Shah Abbas's strategy makes good sense. As early as the Parthian era, when the city of Urfa became the center of the Christian faith, Iranian monarchs had placed a considerable amount of political weight on their treatment of individuals and groups that did not share their religious ideology. Armenia, for instance, remained a bone of contention between Iran and Rome until the rise of Islam. At that time, Armenians were treated royally whenever they chose to cooperate and quite the reverse when they chose to uphold the interests of their coreligionists. Shah Abbas, in a way, adopted the same tested strategy. He treated the Armenians harshly when they were likely to fall into Ottoman hands but quite royally when they proved to be useful in furthering his plans.

Early in his reign, Shah Abbas moved Iran's capital and seat of government from vulnerable Tabriz to the security of Isfahan, an already existing city well-known as a commercial center on the Silk Road. Then, encouraged by Iran's increasing economic, military, and political relations with the west (read the Papacy and Spain), he transferred the entire Armenian population of Jolfa, Azerbaijan, to the town of New Julfa on the south bank of the Zayandeh-Rud, a little upstream from Isfahan. Before long, Armenians living outside Iran as well as Christian missionaries, traders, and industrialists flooded the recent addition to Isfahan, making Julfa a showcase for Safavid achievements in economic, social, and religious spheres as well as an example of tolerance and understanding among diverse ethnic and religious groups in the region.

Early in his reign, Shah Abbas moved Iran's capital and seat of government from vulnerable Tabriz to the security of Isfahan, an already existing city well-known as a commercial center on the Silk Road. Then, encouraged by Iran's increasing economic, military, and political relations with the west (read the Papacy and Spain), he transferred the entire Armenian population of Jolfa, Azerbaijan, to the town of New Julfa on the south bank of the Zayandeh-Rud, a little upstream from Isfahan. Before long, Armenians living outside Iran as well as Christian missionaries, traders, and industrialists flooded the recent addition to Isfahan, making Julfa a showcase for Safavid achievements in economic, social, and religious spheres as well as an example of tolerance and understanding among diverse ethnic and religious groups in the region.
Please log in or register to post comments